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These are the creators behind the award-winning Hamilton Troll story series. Three generations of women determined to educate this generations youth through these inspiring and eye-catching books.

three of us
Kathleen J. Shields, Author - Learn more...

Leigh A. Klug, Illustrator - Learn more...

Carol W. Bryant, Illustrator - Learn more...

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Characters

Each character in the Hamilton Troll series has something to offer young readers. Read about them here. Click on an image to proceed.

Hamilton Troll

Hamilton Troll

Hamilton is a curious and adventurous troll who just wants to learn and make friends. He asks questions, and shares what he learns with others so they too will learn. hamiltonsthoughts

Pink Light Sprite

Pink Light Sprite

The guardian angel of the group, Pink Light Sprite watches over the children in each story. She can actually be found hiding in at least one page of every story.

Barney Bee

Barney Bee

Barney has a sweet tooth. He spends the entire day flying from flower to flower eating pollen until his wings can’t hold him and he falls right out of the sky. Hamilton then determines that Barney may need to exercise in order to get flying again.

buzz on barney

Skeeter Skunk

Skeeter Skunk

Skeeter just wants to join in the big Stick-Nut game, but whenever the ball comes flying towards him or the crowd cheers loudly, it scares Skeeter, and when young skunks get scared, the accidentally spray everyone. Hamilton and his friends try all sorts of things to get Skeeter to stop.

sliding

Chatterton Squirrel

Chatterton Squirrel

Chatterton’s parents are teaching him and his siblings how to jump from one tree to the next but Chatterton is terrified of falling! Hamilton watches the class and Chatterton’s brilliant idea, but when he hears Chatterton still needs to learn he comes up with a great idea and plan for him to practice.

fall in love

Fiona the Dog

Fiona the Dog

Things were going missing; Merle Mouse’s mat, Rudy Rat’s hat and even Hamilton Troll! But Fiona learns through Hamilton that it is not nice to take other people’s things and that she should return them.

an-idea

Starlit Troll

Starlit Troll

A flock of ducks are flying south for the winter, and atop one of the ducks back is Starlit Troll venturing out to explore the world. She stops by to see Hamilton and meet his friends.

Rosa Raccoon

Rosa Raccoon

Rosa is beside herself when she tells Hamilton about the mean new kid Rudy Rat. “He popped my mushroom ball!” she exclaims after detailing all of the other bad things he’s done. Hamilton decides to have a talk with Rudy and then the children to solve the problem. rosaexplainsrudy

Whitaker Owl

Whitaker Owl

Whitaker’s parents were teaching him how to hoot, because owls don’t instinctively know how just like human children need to be taught how to talk. Whitaker’s hoot though sounded more like a ghost’s eerie boo or he shrilled so loud it hurt Hamilton’s ears.

header2

Rudy Rat

Rudy Rat

Rudy Rat was not very nice in the story but when the children were taught by Hamilton Troll to join together, tell Rudy what he was doing was not nice but ask him to play with them even though, Rudy learns it is more rewarding to have friends than make enemies.

rosaexplainsrudy

Merle Mouse

Merle Mouse

Merle Mouse was Hamilton’s first friend. Hamilton met him when he was injured in the story “Hamilton Troll meets Pink Light Sprite”. In later stories you see where Merle lives as Hamilton goes to him when he is afraid when he lost his tree and when he was looking for Starlit Troll.

hamilton moused

Troll TV

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Reviews

I can relate to his eating problem, I love his spunky personality and the dedication to the Texas Wildflowers is an excellent touch! Thank you for writing such educational content. ~ June C.

Barney Bee is my favorite story so far!

I had a chance to read this book at a friend’s house and I have ordered copies for my young nieces. I love the story and the illustrations are great. You will fall in love with this Troll. Can’t wait for the next in series. ~ Christi

I love the story and the illustrations are great.

Kathleen J. Shields has succeeded in creating an adorable character named Hamilton Troll who will charm the hearts of readers young and old. “Hamilton Troll Meets Pink Light Sprite” will not only capture your child’s imagination, it will also teach them to be brave like Hamilton when facing their problems. This whimsical, rhythmic tale is further enhanced by the vivid illustrations of Leigh A. Klug. Leigh’s artistic background and creativity have come together to bring the creatures of Hamilton Woods to life. This busy mother of two appreciates the chance to rediscover childlike wonder in the delightful story of “Hamilton Troll Meets Pink Light Sprite” and looks forward to meeting more of Hamilton’s friends and joining them on their adventures. ~ Stefanie D.

Hamilton Troll will charm the hearts of readers young and old.

My heart went out to him when he sat there crying, embarrassed because he had sprayed everyone. But then when everyone came together to help him my heart just soared! You go Skeeter! ~ April

Skeeter is so adorable!

This is a wonderful book. Great stories appeal to multiple generations and this one has. Kathleen Shields has let us all remember the magical time in our lives when our mystical friends reminded us of their ever present love and protection. ~ John A.

Great stories appeal to multiple generations and this one has.

I am a tutor for our school district here in Lubbock, TX. I will be sure to take this book along to read with my Pre-K and Kindergarten students in the Fall. ~ Kelly T.

A school tutor

I just recently read this story and laughed myself silly. He ate so many sweets he couldn’t fly! How many of us have felt that way before? Kathleen has carefully crafted the dreaded E-word (exercise) into a story children won’t mind reading. ~ Nan

I laughed myself silly

Our little Logan loved the book. He has taken it to school, 3 years old, school. He has not put it down since he got it . He loves the little characters. His sister and I have been reading it to him every night. He can’t wait for the other books! ~ Annette T. & Kelly T.

He has not put it down since he got it.

I have read your latest book about Hamilton and his friend Skeeter the Skunk, and find it delightful. I kept wondering how on earth you were going to pull it off. How could a skunk not smell? All kids know they stink, but then you handled it beautifully, even making the little fella socially acceptable!! ~ Mary Ann K.

Delightful!

I bought this book for my 8 year old granddaughter – a reluctant reader. I was happily surprised by her reaction. Hamilton captured her imagination as she read and re-read the story aloud, pointing out to me the definition of “transplant” inserted at the bottom of one page. She’s anxiously waiting on the next adventure. ~ Janeil A.

Hamilton captured her imagination as she read and re-read the story aloud

An adorable little troll with a sensitive side who does good deeds for others. That is not what people think of trolls. Kathleen Shields, puts heart and takes out toughness from her endearing character, Hamilton Troll. This story will be loved by young children and will not frighten them. I think there should be more books like this. Children learn the importance of treating one another in kind ways. Kathleen has shown that for a children’s story to be interesting it doesn’t have to have violence in it. Our children see enough violence every day in the news. They need an escape from all that and this author has provided just that in her book. It lets children be children again and allows a safe place to explore and learn. Thank you Kathleen! My grandchildren will love it! ~ Janice

An adorable little troll with a sensitive side who does good deeds for others.

I read the Hamilton Troll series and found them to be inspiring. I particularly like the illustrations and how Kathleen chose to use some complex words for young readers but ensured to include a caption explaining terms in young readers terms. ~ Kathy U.

I read the Hamilton Troll series and found them to be inspiring.

I was asked by the writer to review this book and it is one of very few books for children I have agreed to read and review. I found this a delightful tale of a troll who meets a new friend and learns a lesson in how to get over his fears. He is also given practical advice on how to protect his home in a storm and how to transplant a plant carefully. He wanders the woods helping the animals and giving out hugs and giggling, which is rather nice. The Illustrations are beautifully done and the colours are not garish or too bright, which I have found in a lot of modern children’s books. However the best bit about this book is the narrative of rhyme which is sophisticated, child oriented and has good rhythm. I can imagine reading this to my granddaughter at quite a pace, and keeping her interest with the words and the fine detail in the pictures. A very good book for children. – Janette

The narrative of rhyme is sophisticated, child oriented and has good rhythm.

Hamilton Troll is pleased to meet his first bee friend Barney one sunny day. Although Barney teaches Hamilton a lot about bees and flowers, spreading pollen, and making honey from nectar, Barney Bee is getting tubby from his habit of eating honey, nectar and pollen. This may compromise his ability to fly and meet other bee responsibilities. Hamilton counsels him “..besides eating sweets, you must do other things, hobbies, games, how ’bout friends?” In listening to Barney Bee’s answer, Hamilton learns some interesting facts about bees, such as male drone bees cannot sting and bees are color blind, and see red flowers as grey, which is not appealing to them. Finally Barney is ground-bound for awhile because of his overeating of sweets, and Hamilton encourages him to move about and exercise to wear off some of his excess honey weight, so he can fly again. Thus Barney learns a valuable lesson of moderation in sweets intake. Barney also shows Hamilton how to identify 6 species of Texas wildflowers that bees love to pollinate. Children age 4 and up will enjoy learning about bees with Hamilton, and games like searching for Pink Light Sprite in the colorful illustrations will help keep reader interest high. The wildflower illustrations are authentic, while the characters of Hamilton and Barney are imaginatively presented against a natural wild prairie background. – Midwest Book Review

Charmingly illustrated narrative verse series for preschoolers

“Hamilton Troll Meets Skeeter Skunk” is the second hardback book of the distinctive, color illustrated series. Green Hamilton Troll enjoys playing stick-and nut-games with his forest friends, but when Skeeter Skunk wants to join in the game, stinky problems arise. The forest friends do not hold Skeeter to blame for his unconscious defensive behavior of releasing a stinky spray when he is surprised, and they try every possible solution to help him control his spray they can imagine. In the end, Skeeter Skunk is so impressed by their acceptance of him that he grows into an ability to control his spray. The book ends with a rousing and surprising final stick and nut game that Skeeter participates in with joy. Told in rhyme, with hint vocabulary definitions on select pages, “Hamilton Troll Meets Skeeter Skunk” is first class educational entertainment for children age 4 and up. The bright and breezy color illustrations make the story come alive.  – Midwest Book Review

First class educational entertainment for children age 4 and up.

Meaningful content and colorful, original illustrations. I purchased the series plus Dandy Lion for my four great nephews and my great niece. When I read Hamilton Troll Meets Chatterton Squirrel to the pre-school boys, they loved the artwork. The rhyme appealed to the lower elementary boys who are still mastering sound/symbol relationships. Hamilton’s simple life lessons are important and easy for all young children to understand and are presented in a manner subtle enough to invite adult-child conversation after reading the book. My great niece, an advanced reader in third grade, picked up Dandy Lion on her own and read it cover to cover. From a great aunt’s point of view, I am happy to see sweet characters in books as opposed to the smart-mouthed characters so prevalent in today’s television, movies, and many books. Kudos to Kathleen and her illustrators! – Jan B.

The Hamilton Troll books are beautiful in every way:

Color

Print out these fun activities like coloring pages, mazes, find the differences, word searches, connect the dots and color by numbers for more fun after the stories.

Coloring

Coloring

coloring book pagepinklightsprite2bb flowerdino page

Mazes

Mazes

maze Hmaze elwoodmaze flowermaze bee flower

Differences

Differences

6 differencesdifferent squirrel5 differences

Word Search

Word Search

word search trollword search PLSword search CS

Miscellaneous

Miscellaneous

connect the dots hidden message color by numbers

Games

sweetsnapshapekittenbeestreeslidingblueredwobloxrainbow
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Did You Know

Raccoons

Raccoons

  • Raccoons climb trees when they feel threatened. They also make their homes in old tree hollows (holes).
  • Their eyes are surrounded by brown/black fur (mask).
  • Raccoons have been known to clean their food.
  • They are good at problem solving and can remember solutions for up to three years.
Frogs

Frogs

  • Frogs don’t drink; they absorb water through their skin.
  • The smallest known frog is about 1in long, and the largest known frog is about a foot long.
  • There are over 4,000 frog species in the world, with only 88 of them in the United States
Rabbits

Rabbits

  • Rabbits are very social and need lots of love and attention
  • Rabbits teeth grow continuously throughout their life.
  • Rabbits ears help regulate their temperature.
Owls

Owls

  • Owls cannot chew their food because they do not have teeth. Instead, they swallow their food whole.
  • When their food contains things they can’t digest, they regurgitate pellets (throw-up)
  • Owls are unable to move their eyes which means they must turn their entire head to see in a different direction.
Armadillos

Armadillos

  • Armadillos are the only living mammals with armor-like shells.
  • Armadillos are born as identical quadruplets (4 exact copies)
  • Armadillos have poor vision, but they have a strong sense of smell.  They can smell up to 7 inches below the ground!
  • Armadillos sleep for 18-19 hours a day and are active at night.
  • Some armadillos can roll into a ball when they sense danger, but not all can.

Beavers

Beavers

  • Semi-aquatic, meaning they live in the water and walk on land.
  • Beavers have thick fur and webbed feet for swimming.
  • Beavers have large flat tails they use as paddles and packing mud on dams.
  • Beavers have sharp teeth for gnawing on wood that grow back like fingernails.
  • Beavers are herbivores, they eat wood and plants.
Woodpeckers

Woodpeckers

  • Woodpeckers can peck up to 20 times per second
  • They tap holes in trees to find bugs to eat. They also drink tree sap and eat fruits, nuts and seeds.
  • Woodpecker feet have toes that face front AND back so they can grip hold of anything (tree or pole)

 

Squirrels

Squirrels

  • Squirrels can swivel their hind feet backwards
  • They can jump about 4 feet high or about 9 feet horizontally
  • They can run about 12 miles per hour
Skunks

Skunks

  • Young skunks accidentally spray when they are afraid.
  • Skunks have poor eyesight but excellent hearing and sight.
  • They can run 10 miles per hour.

 

Bees

Bees

  • Bees are colorblind? They can’t see the color RED
  • Male drone bees can’t sting
  • Some Bumble bee’s don’t live in hives most live in the ground.
  • They only make enough honey to feed themselves.

Author

Watch author Kathleen J. Shields read to a group of students, answer questions and watch some great reviews and testimonials. Just press the play button, this video player will advance automatically to the next video.